7 Simple Ways to Get More Comments on Your Blog

Posted July 20, 2010 | Laura Christianson

The whole “blog comments thing” is the bane of most bloggers, who assume that if no one comments if means no one is reading, or that people are reading but aren’t all that interested in what you have to say.

Not so. Did you know that less than 1% of all blog readers leave comments? (That’s not scientifically proven, but I have heard that statistic bandied about over the years).

Particularly in our oversaturated cyber world, in which many people read a handful – or even dozens – of blogs per day, most of us don’t take the time to comment unless something really resonates with us (or ticks us off).

Don’t measure your blogging success or your personal worth by the numbers of comments (or lack thereof) you receive.

Still, there are a few things you can do to encourage comments:

1.  Ask a simple question related to the post’s theme at the end of each entry. The easier the question is to answer, the more chance you’ll have of receiving comments. Experiment with different types of questions and figure out what works.

2.  Don’t require people to register for your blog before they’re allowed to comment. The registration requirement scares people away and many people don’t like taking the time to add yet another password to their arsenal.

On my blog, I require that commenters submit the bare minimum: an e-mail address (visible only to me). Having an e-mail address from a real person helps cut down on auto-generated spam. It doesn’t eliminate it, but it significantly reduces spam.

3.  Don’t moderate comments. When people learn that you pre-approve comments, they may be hesitant to leave additional comments because they might feel you don’t trust them. If you write about controversial issues, moderating comments is a smart choice, but if you’re delivering mainly informational tips and tutorials, most of the comments you’ll receive will likely NOT be of an inflammatory nature.

4. Respond to social media comments. Many of us stream our blog feed into Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and other social media accounts. We also syndicate our blogs so our subscribers receive our latest updates via e-mail. I often receive comments about my blog posts via my social media accounts or via e-mail.

Some bloggers get hot and bothered when this happens to them. “Why don’t people comment on my blog itself?” they whine.

I say, “Get over it.”

People have different preferences in reading blogs, and we need to go where our audience goes. If someone comments on your blog post via Facebook, respond to their comment on Facebook. Simple.

5.  Use Google Analytics, a stats-tracking application that provides detailed information about who’s visiting your blog, where they’re coming from, and what blog posts are getting the most readers. Oftentimes, the posts that get the most hits also get more comments. It’s a good tool to help you analyze the types of articles that most appeal to your readers.

6.  If and when someone comments, reply to them. Sometimes it’s challenging to come up with more than a quick, “Thanks for your comment, Alicia,” but even that is better than nothing. Address the commenter by name or by screen name and try to add some additional “meaty” content to the discussion. When your readers feel noticed and genuinely appreciated, they’re more likely to become loyal readers and post additional comments.

7.  Expect the unexpected. I write several types of blog posts (tutorials, reviews, commentary) and monitor the types that get the most comments. I’m often surprised when posts I thought would get comments receive none, and when posts I assumed no one would care about get comments. Recently, I posted a random Twitter update and received a comment from a “top 10, big name” blogger a few minutes later. Who knew he was following my updates?

BONUS TIP: Comment on others’ blogs & social media accounts. This post was inspired by a LinkedIn discussion to which I contributed a comment. The day after I submitted a comment, I received a “connection” request from another member of the LinkedIn group. She told me she wanted to connect because she liked my comment.

I’m hopeful that my new virtual friend will become a loyal reader of my blog and begin submitting comments.

You never know who may stumble across your blog. So treat all commenters with equal respect and learn from them.

Your turn! What’s your best tip for encouraging comments?

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65 responses to “7 Simple Ways to Get More Comments on Your Blog”

  1. […] This post was mentioned on Twitter by JBH PR & Marketing and Laura Christianson, Kim Auclair. Kim Auclair said: RT @juliebonnheath: RT: @bloggingbistro 7 simple ways to get more comments on your blog – http://ht.ly/2bIDs […]

  2. […] This post was mentioned on Twitter by JBH PR & Marketing and Laura Christianson, Kim Auclair. Kim Auclair said: RT @juliebonnheath: RT: @bloggingbistro 7 simple ways to get more comments on your blog – http://ht.ly/2bIDs […]

  3. Juli Monroe says:

    Post a blog post on commenting on blog posts. 🙂

    But seriously, be controversial sometimes. If we are too vanilla, we don't offend, but we also don't excite interest.

    Also, sometimes we, as bloggers, like to say everything we can on a subject. Which doesn't leave much room for comment. So sometimes say less and see if that gets people to chime in.

  4. Juli Monroe says:

    Post a blog post on commenting on blog posts. 🙂

    But seriously, be controversial sometimes. If we are too vanilla, we don't offend, but we also don't excite interest.

    Also, sometimes we, as bloggers, like to say everything we can on a subject. Which doesn't leave much room for comment. So sometimes say less and see if that gets people to chime in.

  5. Cross Cultural Afp says:

    This is very true. I may have to change a few things on my blogs.

  6. Cross Cultural Afp says:

    This is very true. I may have to change a few things on my blogs.

  7. Jan says:

    Since comments are supposed to help with Search Engine Optimization some of my writer friends and I leave comments on each others' blogs.

  8. Jan says:

    Since comments are supposed to help with Search Engine Optimization some of my writer friends and I leave comments on each others' blogs.

  9. Juli – I agree with being controversial (sometimes). I don't believe in being controversial just for the sake of eliciting comments, but if a controversial issue comes up, by all means, tackle it and invite readers to share their views.

    I often read blog posts that are so thorough I feel as if I'd sound stupid if I added a comment. “The blogger has covered every possible angle, so why bother?” I think. Excellent idea to cover a snippet of a subject and leave room for others to add their two cents worth.

  10. Juli – I agree with being controversial (sometimes). I don't believe in being controversial just for the sake of eliciting comments, but if a controversial issue comes up, by all means, tackle it and invite readers to share their views.

    I often read blog posts that are so thorough I feel as if I'd sound stupid if I added a comment. “The blogger has covered every possible angle, so why bother?” I think. Excellent idea to cover a snippet of a subject and leave room for others to add their two cents worth.

  11. Glad to have been some help!

  12. Glad to have been some help!

  13. Commenting can help with SEO, but it's not the primary measurement tool search engines use to determine your site's rank. At least that's what my SEO expert tells me.

  14. Commenting can help with SEO, but it's not the primary measurement tool search engines use to determine your site's rank. At least that's what my SEO expert tells me.

  15. Mlchgarden says:

    The very few times I've had comments my blog topic was about “doing something” like cooking with herbs , for example. I am finding more comments as my blog note is forwarded to Facebook…Many comments when I ask a question like “Do you have a favorite recipe using garden fresh veggies/herbs?” I should do that more often! Also, just figured out the RSS feed, but wondering if better to have blog updates go to reader's emails instead of reader…see you. ml

  16. Mlchgarden says:

    The very few times I've had comments my blog topic was about “doing something” like cooking with herbs , for example. I am finding more comments as my blog note is forwarded to Facebook…Many comments when I ask a question like “Do you have a favorite recipe using garden fresh veggies/herbs?” I should do that more often! Also, just figured out the RSS feed, but wondering if better to have blog updates go to reader's emails instead of reader…see you. ml

  17. Agree with the suggestion to respond to comments. Do you prefer doing that in the comments section or by an individual email (since most Blogger members have their email in their profile)?

  18. Agree with the suggestion to respond to comments. Do you prefer doing that in the comments section or by an individual email (since most Blogger members have their email in their profile)?

  19. I would offer both options (Feedburner forms allow you to syndicate your blog to both feed readers and e-mail). Readers have different habits of reading blogs. I prefer to subscribe to blogs by e-mail, because otherwise, I'll forget to read them. But I know lots of people who are die-hard feed reader fans. They usually subscribe to lots of blogs and scan the headlines of all their feeds daily.

  20. I would offer both options (Feedburner forms allow you to syndicate your blog to both feed readers and e-mail). Readers have different habits of reading blogs. I prefer to subscribe to blogs by e-mail, because otherwise, I'll forget to read them. But I know lots of people who are die-hard feed reader fans. They usually subscribe to lots of blogs and scan the headlines of all their feeds daily.

  21. Richard – I prefer to respond in the comments section. Blogs are intended to be “social,” and by responding in the comments area, you're more likely to encourage conversation. However, people often e-mail me their comments so they can discuss a topic confidentially. In that case, I e-mail the reader, and sometimes I ask if I can post their comment anonymously.

  22. Richard – I prefer to respond in the comments section. Blogs are intended to be “social,” and by responding in the comments area, you're more likely to encourage conversation. However, people often e-mail me their comments so they can discuss a topic confidentially. In that case, I e-mail the reader, and sometimes I ask if I can post their comment anonymously.

  23. P.S. Funny you should mention favorite recipes using garden fresh herbs. My hubby and I just planted a bunch of herbs — now we're trying to ID them! I just returned from the library with three herb almanacs.

  24. P.S. Funny you should mention favorite recipes using garden fresh herbs. My hubby and I just planted a bunch of herbs — now we're trying to ID them! I just returned from the library with three herb almanacs.

  25. Marc Vun Kannon says:

    I often comment on other people's bloigs, and I add my own blog account url. Lots of people click back through that. I'll have to practice the 'ask a question' technique.

    Marc Vun Kannon
    http://authorguy.wordpress.com

  26. Marc Vun Kannon says:

    I often comment on other people's bloigs, and I add my own blog account url. Lots of people click back through that. I'll have to practice the 'ask a question' technique.

    Marc Vun Kannon
    http://authorguy.wordpress.com

  27. […] 7 Simple Ways to Get More Comments on Your Blog | Blogging Bistro […]

  28. […] 7 Simple Ways to Get More Comments on Your Blog | Blogging Bistro […]

  29. I do that too, Marc (or I'll add my Twitter or Facebook URL — whichever seems most appropriate for the particular venue at which I'm commenting).

    Blog comment systems almost always include a way for you to link to a website URL. But that doesn't mean you have to leave your website. You can leave your blog URL, or a social media URL. Or you can include a link to a URL as a signature line at the end of your comment.

    Just a word of caution — don't get too carried away with leaving links to all your accounts. Most blogging systems flag comments that include more than two URLs as spam. The blog owners don't like seeing multiple URLs, either — they consider it as a sales pitch by the commenter.

    So use URL links judiciously, folks!

  30. I do that too, Marc (or I'll add my Twitter or Facebook URL — whichever seems most appropriate for the particular venue at which I'm commenting).

    Blog comment systems almost always include a way for you to link to a website URL. But that doesn't mean you have to leave your website. You can leave your blog URL, or a social media URL. Or you can include a link to a URL as a signature line at the end of your comment.

    Just a word of caution — don't get too carried away with leaving links to all your accounts. Most blogging systems flag comments that include more than two URLs as spam. The blog owners don't like seeing multiple URLs, either — they consider it as a sales pitch by the commenter.

    So use URL links judiciously, folks!

  31. Linda says:

    I just discovered your blog and have already found many helpful tips. I’ve only been blogging since June, so I still have lots to learn. Thanks!

  32. Linda says:

    I just discovered your blog and have already found many helpful tips. I’ve only been blogging since June, so I still have lots to learn. Thanks!

  33. Thanks for learning right along with us, Linda. Feel free to submit your questions about blogging — those give me ideas for new posts tutorials.

  34. Thanks for learning right along with us, Linda. Feel free to submit your questions about blogging — those give me ideas for new posts tutorials.

  35. Jesse Willms says:

    This is a really excellent read for me. Must agree that you are one of the coolest bloggers I ever saw. Thanks for posting this useful article.

  36. Jesse Willms says:

    This is a really excellent read for me. Must agree that you are one of the coolest bloggers I ever saw. Thanks for posting this useful article.

  37. Susan says:

    I have the same issue in online teaching:  how to encourage students to engage in discussions.  Aside from requiring them to do it by grading them (which I don’t), I find that asking questions that inspire creative reflection is good, especially if I’m willing to answer my own question first.  And a bit of humor never hurts.  As an icebreaker in a class for preachers, I asked them ‘if you were a (non-human) biblical creature, who would you be? and why?’  I said I’d be the snake in the garden, not because he was evil, but because he made the human beings think, for the first time.

  38. Susan says:

    I have the same issue in online teaching:  how to encourage students to engage in discussions.  Aside from requiring them to do it by grading them (which I don’t), I find that asking questions that inspire creative reflection is good, especially if I’m willing to answer my own question first.  And a bit of humor never hurts.  As an icebreaker in a class for preachers, I asked them ‘if you were a (non-human) biblical creature, who would you be? and why?’  I said I’d be the snake in the garden, not because he was evil, but because he made the human beings think, for the first time.

  39. That’s a thought-provoking question, Susan! May I use it as one of my social media tips of the day (on the @bloggingbistro Facebook page)?

  40. That’s a thought-provoking question, Susan! May I use it as one of my social media tips of the day (on the @bloggingbistro Facebook page)?

  41. […] post first appeared on July 20, 2010 on Blogging Bistro. Used by kind […]

  42. […] post first appeared on July 20, 2010 on Blogging Bistro. Used by kind […]

  43. Roving Jay says:

    I use WordPress, and loading up the plugin “Comment Luv” also helps to encourage other bloggers to leave comments.  It allows them to choose an active link from a list of their recent blog posts, to display at the end of their comment.  I know this encourages me to leave a comments on others blog, and as usually happens in the blogosphere – you see something good, and emulate it.
     

  44. Roving Jay says:

    I use WordPress, and loading up the plugin “Comment Luv” also helps to encourage other bloggers to leave comments.  It allows them to choose an active link from a list of their recent blog posts, to display at the end of their comment.  I know this encourages me to leave a comments on others blog, and as usually happens in the blogosphere – you see something good, and emulate it.
     

  45. I use Comment Luv on some of my sites, too. I haven’t noticed a huge increase in traffic because of it, but it does seem to help with reader engagement. You are so right about that plugin encouraging you to comment on OTHERS’ blogs, because you get a little extra SEO “juice” because of it. Thanks for sharing.

  46. I use Comment Luv on some of my sites, too. I haven’t noticed a huge increase in traffic because of it, but it does seem to help with reader engagement. You are so right about that plugin encouraging you to comment on OTHERS’ blogs, because you get a little extra SEO “juice” because of it. Thanks for sharing.

  47. Max Attract says:

    I think a commentluv and keywordluv plugin could add to the ways on how we can get more comments. It is said that it attracts readers and will able them to leave a backlink, more like a “Give and Take” relationship between us and the blog owner.

  48. Max Attract says:

    I think a commentluv and keywordluv plugin could add to the ways on how we can get more comments. It is said that it attracts readers and will able them to leave a backlink, more like a “Give and Take” relationship between us and the blog owner.

  49. I realized this recently that most visitors don’t comment. Think about why you might not comment on a blog and there you go. LOL… I generally like to leave comments when the writer gives some value. In my giving thanks, I’m rewarded with (DoFollow sometimes) a backlink and the chance for others to see my face. 

    Blogging just goes along with the saying. Do unto others as you want them to do unto you. I don’t expect comments but I love to get them. 

    I suggest using the CommentLuv also. It rewards other bloggers who leave comments. I use this on all my blogs.

    Thanks for this post.. I see I have some more things to apply..

  50. I realized this recently that most visitors don’t comment. Think about why you might not comment on a blog and there you go. LOL… I generally like to leave comments when the writer gives some value. In my giving thanks, I’m rewarded with (DoFollow sometimes) a backlink and the chance for others to see my face. 

    Blogging just goes along with the saying. Do unto others as you want them to do unto you. I don’t expect comments but I love to get them. 

    I suggest using the CommentLuv also. It rewards other bloggers who leave comments. I use this on all my blogs.

    Thanks for this post.. I see I have some more things to apply..

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