What Tomatoes, Potatoes, Hubby Haircuts, and the End of the World Have in Common (and How it Relates to Blogging)

By Laura Christianson

During the past few weeks, I’ve been recovering from a broken rib. Propped up on pillows, snuggling with my ever-present ice pack, I’ve done zero blogging but a lot of reading.

Talk Like TEDI’m reading Talk Like TED: The 9 Public-Speaking Secrets of the World’s Top Minds, by Carmine Gallo.

While this book is geared primarily for public speakers, it’s also perfect for bloggers, writers, and business professionals – anyone who wants to improve their communication skills. In Chapter 1, Gallo asks:

“What makes your heart sing?”

I asked myself that question in relation to my work, and my answer was:

My heart sings when a client I’m working with (usually a self-proclaimed technophobe) exclaims, “Oh! I get it! I really can do this. This isn’t as hard as I thought it would be.”

I love it when a client implements the techniques we’ve discussed and then takes it a step further and experiments with things we haven’t discussed – and discovers that it works.

At Blogging Bistro, we get to work with many talented and creative clients. In upcoming posts, I’ll feature some of the innovative things our clients are doing on their blogs, websites, and social channels. I hope you’ll discover fresh ideas you can apply to your own projects.

Amy_NowakOne blogger I am particularly impressed with is Amy Nowak, whose website we recently built. Some of Amy’s recent posts are titled:

If you’re wondering what tomatoes, potatoes, hubby haircuts, and the end of the world have in common, you’ll figure it out the instant you begin reading Amy’s blog posts.

Amy is a pre-published historical fiction author who specializes in the era of Old Spanish Missions of the American Southwest. On the “About the Author” page of Amy’s website, she writes:

“I write to learn historical truths, examine the relics of the past, and create memorable stories bursting with hope.”

Every article on Amy’s blog is a fascinating blend of historical tidbits, humor, and thoughtful pondering.

When Will the World End?” introduces us to Joachim of Fiore, the twelfth century Italian theologian who came up with a dispensation theory. Amy then takes us on a whirlwind tour through history to show us how various religious groups approach eschatology (the study of end times).

Tomato History is a Blast asks us to imagine a world without ketchup. Amy writes:

Imagine a world without ketchup. Or pizza without tomato sauce. In fact, if you can (and despite the horror) delete from your memory banks any tomato based spaghetti sauce, salsa, gazpacho, ratatouille, soup, and (oh my, this is difficult) BLT sandwiches … without the T! Someone call Chef Boyardee, I may faint!

She goes on to share the origins of the tomato and somehow relates that to taxes and the Supreme Court. And it all makes sense!

InWhy I Cut My Husband’s Hair,” Amy opens with an anecdote from her own life and cleverly ties it in with the history of the tonsure, the hairstyle du jour among sixth century clergy. At the end of her article, Amy re-enters the present and concludes the anecdote about her husband’s haircut.

Potatoes in My Pantry opens with:

“What do you eat for breakfast? Cereal? Eggs? Cold mac and cheese tossed into the air while your open mouth awaits?”

Got you thinking, didn’t it?

That appetizing lead morphs into a discussion of how the humble potato changed the gastronomic world.

Amy’s artful blend of storytelling, historical research, and personal reflection weaves a tale guaranteed to interest even the most reluctant history student.

Whether you write historical fiction, want to improve your blogging skills, or just love history, I think you’ll enjoy Amy’s blog. Subscribe via email or your feed reader at AmyNowak.com.

Click this image to download your free checklist that includes EVERYTHING you need to do prior to publishing a blog post! Or simply text PREPUB to 44222!

Side note:

Amy’s website, which the Blogging Bistro team designed and developed, is a custom WordPress site that uses responsive design technology.

In plain English, that means that the design “responds” to the screen size on which you’re viewing it, whether it’s a desktop computer, tablet, or smartphone.

This screenshot shows you how Amy’s site looks when viewed on four different devices (click image to enlarge):

The artwork of the friar, donkey, and child (in the bottom lefthand area of Amy’s Home page) was designed by her teenage daughter.

Need a new website?

We’d love to help! We are committed to providing a high-degree of personalized service throughout the website development process, so we take on a limited number of new website projects each month. As a result, we are almost always booked four months in advance.

If you’re thinking of launching a new website in 2015, NOW is the time to reserve a spot on our production calendar. Contact Laura Christianson at info@bloggingbistro.com for a free, no-obligation needs assessment.

  • Donna Smith

    Amy’s site is worthy of honor! Glad you chose her! 🙂 – from Donna L.H. Smith

  • Donna Smith

    Amy’s site is worthy of honor! Glad you chose her! 🙂 – from Donna L.H. Smith

  • Thanks for taking the time to comment, Donna. Amy is an amazing writer and a lovely person. I was fortunate to be able to meet her and get to know her at the Writing for the Soul conference earlier this year. I don’t get to met some of my clients in person, so it’s always a privilege when that happens.

  • Thanks for taking the time to comment, Donna. Amy is an amazing writer and a lovely person. I was fortunate to be able to meet her and get to know her at the Writing for the Soul conference earlier this year. I don’t get to met some of my clients in person, so it’s always a privilege when that happens.

  • Diana Flegal

    sorry to hear you broke a rib! Great info here, Thanks! I will be sure to pass it along to my clients,

  • Diana Flegal

    sorry to hear you broke a rib! Great info here, Thanks! I will be sure to pass it along to my clients,

  • Thanks, Diana. Good to hear from you!

  • Thanks, Diana. Good to hear from you!

  • Pingback: Blogging Bistro | Amy Nowak()

  • Susan

    So sorry to hear about your broken rib. 🙁 I just got over a bruised rib and that was painful enough. Anyway, I don’t normally comment, but I do enjoy and benefit from your articles. Thanks for your great information!

  • Susan

    So sorry to hear about your broken rib. 🙁 I just got over a bruised rib and that was painful enough. Anyway, I don’t normally comment, but I do enjoy and benefit from your articles. Thanks for your great information!

  • Thanks so much for coming out of the “lurker” closet, Susan, and commenting. I appreciate you being part of the Blogging Bistro community.

  • Thanks so much for coming out of the “lurker” closet, Susan, and commenting. I appreciate you being part of the Blogging Bistro community.

  • Sorry about the broken rib. I know this can be painful. thanks for info

  • Sorry about the broken rib. I know this can be painful. thanks for info

  • Thanks, Clella. The ribs are doing much better — I’ve gotten back into the pool to rehab. Feels good to be exercising again.

  • Thanks, Clella. The ribs are doing much better — I’ve gotten back into the pool to rehab. Feels good to be exercising again.

  • Ouch- guess I’m a bit out of touch, Laura. Didn’t know about the broken rib. 🙁 (Guess the deli busy-ness got in the way.) Hope it wasn’t from roller-blading? I remember you mentioning that you do that. I still say a prayer every time I go out in mine!

  • Ouch- guess I’m a bit out of touch, Laura. Didn’t know about the broken rib. 🙁 (Guess the deli busy-ness got in the way.) Hope it wasn’t from roller-blading? I remember you mentioning that you do that. I still say a prayer every time I go out in mine!

  • Jennifer,

    I received your newsletter the other day. As usual, it was entertaining and practical! No, my broken rib was not from rollerblading, but from another sports-related injury. Thanks for asking. I’m fine now.

  • Jennifer,

    I received your newsletter the other day. As usual, it was entertaining and practical! No, my broken rib was not from rollerblading, but from another sports-related injury. Thanks for asking. I’m fine now.