Tutorial: How to Create Ready-made Tweets Using TweetLink

twitter logoLooking for a way to encourage your blog readers to tweet your posts? Make it super easy for your readers to tweet your posts by giving them ready-made tweets. We showed you how to use Click to Tweet in the past, but now we want to show you how to use another free tool to create ready-made tweets for your readers: TweetLink. TweetLink is similar to Click to Tweet but has the added benefit of automatically generating a Twitter image button, which will go far in encouraging your reader to click away and tweet your post. Ready to give TweetLink a whirl?

Create the TweetLink

First, visit www.tweetlink.abiro.com. In the “Message” form field, type or paste in the text for your tweet. We like to include a shortened link to the blog post we want to link to and an @ mention of Blogging Bistro, as in the image below. TweetLink2 Notice that TweetLink provides you with a “URL” form field. Since this puts the URL at the end of the tweet and we like our URL in the middle of the tweet, we just paste the shortened URL into the message area above instead. As for shortening URLs, we like to use bitly because bitly tracks the statistics of the shortened link, including how many people have clicked it. Check out our tutorial on shortening links. I usually skip the “Title” form field because I prefer to use an icon rather than text to create the finished button. This brings us to the final form field, “Icon.” Simply choose whichever icon you like best by clicking the radio button next to it. Click the blue “Create” button to generate the html code you’ll paste into your blog post to create your TweetLink button.

Insert the TweetLink into Your Blog Post

Below the “Create” button, you’ll see several different options for the types of code you can use and a test of what each option will look like. Don’t be intimidated by all the options! For posting in a blog, your best bet is to use “Anchor (short, image).” This option gives you the icon you selected above and contains a shortened version of the code, which makes copying and pasting it a little simpler. TweetLink3 Highlight the code in the “Anchor (short, image)” form field and copy it. Go to your blog post draft and paste the code under the “Text” (HTML) editor. If you’re using WordPress, you’ll need to toggle from “Visual” to “Text,” as in the image below. WP visual vs text editor 3 After you’ve pasted in the TweetLink button code, toggle back to “Visual” to see the button. You can even test out the button by previewing your draft. There’s one last step before you’re done: Let your reader know what the tweet says. Here at Blogging Bistro, we like to let our readers know we’ve created a ready-made tweet for them and we include the text of the tweet. We write something like this (click the “Tweet” icon; it’s live!):

Tweet This Use one of our ready-made tweets to share this article:

TweetLink Tutorial: Learn how to create a ready-made tweet for your readers that includes a Twitter icon button Tweet

Now the reader can simply click the button, and it will open up their Twitter account and let them share a ready-made Tweet like in the image below. Twitter final share

Having trouble?

If you run into a problem while using TweetLink, don’t hesitate to use the TweetLink contact form to ask a question or offer a suggestion. I ran into a snafu but received super fast and helpful responses from Anders, the CEO.

Let’s Talk

Try out TweetLink. What did you think? Do you think you’ll start using it to create ready-made tweets for your blog readers? 

  • Mindy

    I tried this today. It took me awhile to to sign up with Bitly, then go to TweetLink, and back to your blog several times to reread directions, then back into my blog draft to try to apply this knowledge. BUT, as soon as I tweeted with Bitly, I was retweeted and gained a new follower. Before I even really knew what I was doing, I had action. Thanks!

  • Mindy

    I tried this today. It took me awhile to to sign up with Bitly, then go to TweetLink, and back to your blog several times to reread directions, then back into my blog draft to try to apply this knowledge. BUT, as soon as I tweeted with Bitly, I was retweeted and gained a new follower. Before I even really knew what I was doing, I had action. Thanks!

  • Anders Borg

    I’ll consider adding bitly as an optional shortener. I’m aware tracking is important.

  • Anders Borg

    I’ll consider adding bitly as an optional shortener. I’m aware tracking is important.

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  • Thank you, Anders. We appreciate your responsiveness in helping us better understand TweetLink.

  • Thank you, Anders. We appreciate your responsiveness in helping us better understand TweetLink.

  • Mindy, Glad to hear it worked for you. Sometimes, these tools take a bit of practice to master, but once you get the system down, they can be very helpful.

  • Mindy, Glad to hear it worked for you. Sometimes, these tools take a bit of practice to master, but once you get the system down, they can be very helpful.

  • Anders Borg

    There’s now a basic statistics/analytics page (see the top menu) based on the information that can be retrieved from Google.

    You paste in the shortened URL that was given by “Link (short)” and click Create.

    There’s no “hour-per-hour” information, but you can at least see accesses per country etc for a few time spans. The look and layout will be improved.

    bit.ly will be checked out as well.

    To keep tab of what URLs have been shortened (and that there might be stats for) would require user registration. That’s not in the plans at the moment, but might be later.

  • Anders Borg

    There’s now a basic statistics/analytics page (see the top menu) based on the information that can be retrieved from Google.

    You paste in the shortened URL that was given by “Link (short)” and click Create.

    There’s no “hour-per-hour” information, but you can at least see accesses per country etc for a few time spans. The look and layout will be improved.

    bit.ly will be checked out as well.

    To keep tab of what URLs have been shortened (and that there might be stats for) would require user registration. That’s not in the plans at the moment, but might be later.

  • Anders Borg

    Is it correct that the important thing is to be able to track the URL embedded in the tweet, rather than the short link TweetLink generates?

  • Anders Borg

    Is it correct that the important thing is to be able to track the URL embedded in the tweet, rather than the short link TweetLink generates?

  • That would be my first choice, Anders. Google Analytics will track clickthroughs coming from Twitter, and with some link shorteners, they convert it back to the full URL when they display it in the report. I could be wrong about that because I’m not an expert at Google Analytics. But tracking the embedded URL would certainly be most recognizable, and therefore, most helpful.

  • That would be my first choice, Anders. Google Analytics will track clickthroughs coming from Twitter, and with some link shorteners, they convert it back to the full URL when they display it in the report. I could be wrong about that because I’m not an expert at Google Analytics. But tracking the embedded URL would certainly be most recognizable, and therefore, most helpful.

  • There’s now a Shorten page on which you can create shortened links to be embedded in tweets, so with Analyze it’s then possible to do basic tracking both for that link and the short link created for the tweet as a whole. At the time being you need to keep track of what shortened links you use. This should be a bit quicker than shortening at e.g. bit.ly first.

    The Analyze page now shows a chart per time period and data category, yet we also found that if you add “+” to the end of a Google-shortened link you’ll see Google’s own analytics page for that link. That page is linked to at “Google’s own analytics page”. Of course we found this out _after_ the Analyze page had been made.

    Google Analytics should not have any problem tracking goo.gl links. At least that’s the theory, as it’s all Google.

  • There’s now a Shorten page on which you can create shortened links to be embedded in tweets, so with Analyze it’s then possible to do basic tracking both for that link and the short link created for the tweet as a whole. At the time being you need to keep track of what shortened links you use. This should be a bit quicker than shortening at e.g. bit.ly first.

    The Analyze page now shows a chart per time period and data category, yet we also found that if you add “+” to the end of a Google-shortened link you’ll see Google’s own analytics page for that link. That page is linked to at “Google’s own analytics page”. Of course we found this out _after_ the Analyze page had been made.

    Google Analytics should not have any problem tracking goo.gl links. At least that’s the theory, as it’s all Google.

  • That’s a wonderful improvement, Anders. Thanks for alerting us as you continue to refine your tool.

  • That’s a wonderful improvement, Anders. Thanks for alerting us as you continue to refine your tool.

  • Simone Cavadini

    Thank for sharing this unique article !!

  • Simone Cavadini

    Thank for sharing this unique article !!

  • This might be of interest, simplifying things a bit:
    http://tweetlink.abiro.com/quick.php
    It’s still worked on, so suggestions are welcome.

    From Notes:
    – Links in the message will be shortened via Google unless they already are, so you can Analyze them.
    – You may go beyond 140 characters if there’s a link in the message that will be shortened.
    – Use Tweet if you need more than a simple link.

    Also, hovering over menu items now shows what each page is about, and each page description generates a tweet via TweetLink, as a way to test it out and spread the word.

    I found that “http://goo.gl/xxxxxx+” doesn’t guarantee showing of Google’s analytics page, but “http://goo.gl/#analytics/goo.gl/xxxxxx/all_time” always works, so Analyze uses that instead.

  • This might be of interest, simplifying things a bit:
    http://tweetlink.abiro.com/quick.php
    It’s still worked on, so suggestions are welcome.

    From Notes:
    – Links in the message will be shortened via Google unless they already are, so you can Analyze them.
    – You may go beyond 140 characters if there’s a link in the message that will be shortened.
    – Use Tweet if you need more than a simple link.

    Also, hovering over menu items now shows what each page is about, and each page description generates a tweet via TweetLink, as a way to test it out and spread the word.

    I found that “http://goo.gl/xxxxxx+” doesn’t guarantee showing of Google’s analytics page, but “http://goo.gl/#analytics/goo.gl/xxxxxx/all_time” always works, so Analyze uses that instead.

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  • Abiro has developed a new Twitter-related tool that might be useful to some: http://trends.abiro.com/
    It’s fundamentally a convenience tool for dealing with Twitter trends. I use it myself.

    It’s easy to chart different regions and time intervals. 1 month of data is kept for all regions (rolling schedule), so you can move back in time within that window.

    Event handling frees you from checking trends manually. Only the last 10 trends per region can be accessed via Twitter’s API (unless using streaming, which the tool doesn’t at the moment), so keywords can fly by quickly (if spotted at all), yet if it detects a pattern match you’ll receive an e-mail immediately. You can have wildcards in the patterns to catch more keywords.

    You need to register to see more regions than worldwide and to manage events. You then (obviously) have to enter a valid e-mail address to get event alerts.

    Right now it requires all information filled in when registering (I’ll change that), but you can be creative.

    There’s more information on the site.

    In “classical Web 2.0 fashion”, there’s currently no business model, but anyone that signs up in the meantime will never have to pay (promise; not saying the tool will exist forever, nor in the same form).

    If you know of any other place where Twitter-related tools can be presented, I’m all ears. It seems all Twitter Web App directories have been abandoned.

    Feel free to contact me with queries.

    Regards,
    Anders Borg

  • Abiro has developed a new Twitter-related tool that might be useful to some: http://trends.abiro.com/
    It’s fundamentally a convenience tool for dealing with Twitter trends. I use it myself.

    It’s easy to chart different regions and time intervals. 1 month of data is kept for all regions (rolling schedule), so you can move back in time within that window.

    Event handling frees you from checking trends manually. Only the last 10 trends per region can be accessed via Twitter’s API (unless using streaming, which the tool doesn’t at the moment), so keywords can fly by quickly (if spotted at all), yet if it detects a pattern match you’ll receive an e-mail immediately. You can have wildcards in the patterns to catch more keywords.

    You need to register to see more regions than worldwide and to manage events. You then (obviously) have to enter a valid e-mail address to get event alerts.

    There’s more information on the site.

    In “classical Web 2.0 fashion”, there’s currently no business model, but anyone that signs up in the meantime will never have to pay (promise; not saying the tool will exist forever, nor in the same form).

    If you know of any other place where Twitter-related tools can be presented, I’m all ears. It seems all Twitter Web App directories have been abandoned.

    Feel free to contact me with queries.

    Regards,
    Anders Borg

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